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Making Law Work: Chinese Laws in Context

154 Making Law Work
Author: 
Mattias BURELL and Marina SVENSSON, eds.
Publication Year: 
2010
Publication Number: 
154

By studying law implementation in different areas and at different levels, contributors from various disciplines give a nuanced picture of law implementation in China, showing that it is rare to find examples of complete success or failure. Instead, making law work in actual practice, and in any society, is a matter of degree. Successful implementation depends upon many different preconditions, which includes political will, legal knowledge and level of education among officials and other actors, effective enforcement mechanisms, popular trust, and favorable socioeconomic factors. The study is multidisciplinary in character and builds on insights from both sociology of law and political science. | 427 pages


CONTENTS

  • Acknowledgments

Theoretical Frameworks

  • 1. Making Law Work in China Marina Svensson
  • 2. Assessing Implementation of Law in China: What Is the Standard? Randall Peerenboom
  • 3. Putting Law in Context: Some Remarks on the Implementation of Law in China Hakan Hyden

Institutions and Actors in Implementation Work

  • 4. Chinese Courts in Law Implementation Jonas Grimheden
  • 5. People's Congresses Involvement in Law Implementation: The Case of Environmental Protection Laws Oscar Almen
  • 6. From Nothing to Something: Development of a Legal Aid System in China Hatla Thelle

Norms, Politics, and the Law

  • 7. Cultural Heritage Protection in the People's Republic of China: Preservation Policies, Institutions, Laws,and Enforcement in Zhejiang Marina Svensson
  • 8. The Legitimacy of Law in China: The Case of "Black Internet Cafes" Johan Lagerkvist
  • 9. Twists and Turns: Anticorruption Law in Beijing Flora Sapio

Distributive and Regulative Policies and Laws

  • 10. Policy Dilution and Equity Problems: Implementing Housing Policy in China Mattias Burell
  • 11. Regulating Land and Pollution at Lake Dianchi: Compliance and Enforcement in a Chinese and Comparative Perspective Benjamin van Rooij

Contributors | Index


Contributors
  • Oscar ALMEN is researcher at the Department of Government, Uppsala University.
  • Mattias BURELL is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, Uppsala University.
  • Jonas GRIMHELDEN is Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Lund University.
  • Hakan HYDEN is Professor and Chair in Sociology of Law at Lund University.
  • Johan LAGERKVIST is senior research fellow at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs.
  • Randall PEERENBOOM is Professor of Law, La Trobe University, and Associate Fellow at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford University.
  • Benjamin VAN ROOIJ is Professor of Law, Amsterdam University, and director of the Netherlands China Law Center.
  • Flora SAPIO is lecturer at the Instituto Universitario Orientale in Napoli.
  • Marina SVENSSON is Associate Professor at the Centre for East and South-East Asian Studies, Lund University.
  • Hatla THELLE is senior researcher and head of China unit at the Danish Institute for Human Rights, Copenhagen.

ISBN (hardcover): 
978-1-933947-24-2
Price (hardcover): 
$65.00
ISBN (paperback): 
978-1-933947-54-9
Price (paperback): 
$49.00