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CEAS rounds up 2015 with brand new titles!

CEAS 173

Link: https://eap.einaudi.cornell.edu/publication/new-title-portrait-suburbanite-poems-choi-seung-ja

CEAS 173 Portrait of a Suburbanite   Speaking with a fierce sense of equality and independence, Choi Seung-ja’s poetry battled ossified forms of language not only on the political but also the personal front.

 

Link: https://eap.einaudi.cornell.edu/publication/new-title-voices-taiwanese-women-three-contemporary-plays

CEAS 177 Voices of Taiwanese Women: Three Contemporary Plays   John B. Weinstein presents introduces little-known plays written by Taiwanese women. The excellent translations and meticulous stage directions nudge readers towards having these plays performed. And when you or your class do perform one or all of the plays, send your album to ceas@cornell.edu for posting on social media!

 

Link: https://eap.einaudi.cornell.edu/publication/reading-wang-wenxing-critical-essays

CEAS 178 Reading Wang Wenxing: Critical Essays   The first book-length study in English of Wang Wenxing. The essays cover topics that include Wang’s writing principles, typology of characters, analysis of lexicon, and issues of translating Wang’s work into English.

 

Link: https://eap.einaudi.cornell.edu/publication/new-title-1943-china-crossroads

CEAS 180 1943: China at the Crossroads   In the grand narrative of modern Chinese history, 1943 is usually passed over with little notice. However, in thirteen topical chapters, the achievements and disappointments of 1943 are explored in an effort to capture a moment in time, when China stood at the crossroads but the road ahead lay shrouded in the impenetrable fog of war.

 

Previously announced:

Link: https://eap.einaudi.cornell.edu/publication/new-title-sangaku-proofs-japanese-mathematician-work

CEAS 175 Sangaku Proofs: A Japanese Mathematician at Work   This interpretive translation of a suite of twenty-six related problems analyzed by Aida Yasuaki (1747–1817) gives readers unfamiliar with the premodern Japanese language access to a real wasan text. Instead of presenting and solving problems using modern techniques, Unger presents Aida’s own solutions, transcribing his calculations into familiar mathematical notation, highlighting connections between Aida’s work and both the mathematics of today and aspects of Japanese cultural history.