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Like Clouds or Mists: Studies and Translations of Nō Plays of the Genpei War

159 Like Clouds or Mists
Author: 
Elizabeth OYLER and Michael WATSON, eds.
Publication Year: 
2013
Publication Number: 
159

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This volume is organized to roughly follow the order of events presented in the Kakuichi-bon variant of the Heike. Essays and translations focus on a series of major events from the Heike: Kiyomori’s rise (the “Giō” cycle of plays); Yoshinaka’s push to the capital; the flight of the Heike and the battle of Ichi-no-tani; and the aftermath of the war. Each event features a series of one to three plays preceded by essays. | 562 pages


CONTENTS

Foreword Elizabeth Oyler & Michael Watson

  1. Introduction Elizabeth Oyler
  2. Zeami, a Wandering Ghost, and the Lotus Sutra: The Story of Giō and Hotoke from Heike Monogatari to Nō Roberta Strippoli
  3. Introduction and Translation: Giō   Susan K. Matisoff
  4. Introduction and Translation: Hotoke no hara (Buddha Field) David T. Bialock
  5. How Giō saves her Father’s Life: Innovations to the Giō Legend in BangaiMichael Watson
  6. Translation: Rō-Giō (Giō at the Prison) Michael Watson
  7. The Battle of Tonamiyama in Bangai Elizabeth Oyler
  8. Introduction and Translation: Kiso  Ivan Grail
  9. Introduction and Translation: Kurikara Otoshi (The Fall from Kurikara) Michael Watson
  10. Sanemori: Departure from Oral Narrative Takeuchi Akiko
  11. Introduction and Translation: Sanemori   Mae Smethurst
  12. Introduction and Translation: Genzai Sanemori   Mae Smethurst
  13. Shunzei Tadanori, Its Background, and Related Plays Michael Watson
  14. Introduction and Translation: Shunzei Tadanori  Stephen D. Miller and Patrick S. Donnelly
  15. Introduction and Translation: Kiyotsune Carolyn Morley
  16. Preachers and Playwrights: Ikuta Atsumori and the Roots of Nō R. Keller Kimbrough
  17. Introduction and Translation: Ikuta Atsumori Lim Beng Choo
  18. Introduction and Translation: Ko Atsumori R. Keller Kimbrough
  19. The Nō Play Shigehira Paul S. Atkins
  20. Introduction and Translation: Kasa Sotoba (ShigehiraPaul S. Atkins
  21. The Heike, the Nō and Kyōgen Zatō Plays Carolyn Morley
  22. Introduction and Translation: Nasu (Kyōgen)  Carolyn Morley
  23. Morihisa and the Cult of Kannon at Kiyomizudera Gunji Naoko
  24. Performing Kannon’s Grace: The Nō Morihisa Shelley Fenno Quinn
  25. Translation: Morihisa Shelley Fenno Quinn
  26. Genre and the Heike plays in Zeami’s Go on Tom Hare
  27. Translation: The Song about Rokudai Tom Hare
  28. Nō as Political Allegory: The Case of Haku Rakuten  Susan Blakeley Klein
  29. Translation: Haku Rakuten  Susan Blakeley Klein
  30. Epilogue: The Tale of the Heike in the Theatre of the Twentieth Century: Three Examples J. Thomas Rimer
  31. Works Cited 32 Appendix: Nō Plays of the Genpei War, A Finding List Michael Watson

Editors

  • Elizabeth OYLER is Associate Professor of Japanese at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
  • Michael WATSON is Professor of Japanese Culture and Literature at Meiji Gakuin University.

Contributors

  • Paul S. ATKINS is Associate Professor of Japanese in the Department of Asian Languages and Literature at the University of Washington, Seattle.
  • David T. BIALOCK is Associate Professor of Japanese Literature at the University of Southern California, where he also serves as Chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures.
  • Ivan GRAIL lives and works in western Massachusetts.
  • Naoko Gunji is Assistant Professor in the Department of Art History at Augustana College.
  • Tom HARE is William Sauter LaPorte ’28 Professor in Regional Studies, in Comparative Literature at Princeton University.
  • Keller KIMBROUGH is Associate Professor of Japanese in the Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations at the University of Colorado, Boulder.
  • Susan Blakeley KLEIN is Associate Professor of Japanese Literature and Culture, University of California, Irvine.
  • Lim Beng CHOO is Associate Professor in the Department of Japanese Studies, National University of Singapore.
  • Susan MATISOFF is Professor Emerita of Japanese in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at University of California, Berkeley.
  • Stephen D. MILLER is Associate Professor of Japanese Language and Literature at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and author of The Wind from Vulture Peak (CEAS No. 166).
  • Patrick DONNELLY is an associate editor of Poetry International, director of the Advanced Seminar at The Frost Place, and has taught writing at Colby College, the Lesley University MFA Program, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and elsewhere.
  • Carolyn MORLEY, Professor of Japanese Literature and Theater at Wellesley College, specializes in premodern Japanese literature.
  • Elizabeth OYLER is Associate Professor of Japanese at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
  • Shelley Fenno QUINN specializes in literature, culture, and performance traditions of medieval Japan.
  • J. Thomas RIMER is Professor Emeritus of Japanese Literature and Theatre at the University of Pittsburgh.
  • Mae J. SMETHURST is Professor of Classics and Adjunct Professor of East Asian Languages and Literatures at the University of Pittsburgh. She is also editor of The Noh Ominameshi: A Flower Viewed from Many Directions, coeditor, Christina Laffin (Cornell University East Asia Series, 2003) and author of Dramatic Representations of Filial Piety: Five Noh in Translation (Cornell University East Asia Series, 1998).
  • Roberta STRIPPOLI teaches premodern Japanese literature in the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies, Binghamton University.
  • Akiko TAKEUCHI is Professor of Comparative Literature at Hōsei University (Tokyo, Japan).
  • Michael WATSON is Professor of Japanese Literature at Meiji Gakuin University, where he has taught since 1981.

ISBN (hardcover): 
978-1-933947-29-7
Price (hardcover): 
$65.00
ISBN (paperback): 
978-1-933947-59-4
Price (paperback): 
$49.00